Assorted Links

Thanks to David Cramer and Nadalal.

5 Responses to “Assorted Links”

  1. Tom Says:

    There needs to be a Journal of Personal Science.

    Seth: I hope so. Thanks for the suggestion.

  2. Alrenous Says:

    Herring is my fish of choice. This is measured entirely by how it feels to eat it. Now the science tells me it happens to be optimum.

    I recently did a Willat test of oysters vs. mussels and mussels won. As a bonus, mussels are cheaper.

    Also fond of crab, and planning to do a proper test of squid.

    Cod liver oil might be good at mercury and omegas, but in any significant quantities it will give you an overdose of vitamin A. It feels bad to eat.

  3. somebro Says:

    You also want to look out for persistent organic pollutants in fish. Personally, I don’t eat any fish.

  4. Phil Says:

    Funny, on the day you made your post saying that you haven’t seen comparisons between models and predictions except by skeptics, the top entry on RealClimate, the single most prominent global-warming-related blog that is not run by skeptics, was “Evaluating a 1981 temperature projection”: http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2012/04/evaluating-a-1981-temperature-projection/

    Of course, the models have improved a lot since the 1980s but it is still good to look back.

    You might also want to look at the second plot on http://web.archive.org/web/20070323005914/http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/MSU/msusci.html which shows global tropospheric temperature anomaly for a longer series, starting in 1979. See if you can figure out why Evans chose to look at how much the temperature has changed since 1988 rather than choosing predictions from a different year. Think it has anything to do with 1988 having the highest measurements of the entire temperature record up to 1998? Nah, gotta be a coincidence, right? After all, he’s a climate change skeptic, and we can trust those people to give us the straight truth every time.

  5. Selection bias, or, How you can think the experts don’t check their models, if you simply don’t look at what the experts actually are doing « Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science Says:

    [...] response, Phil commented: Funny, on the day you [Seth] made your post saying that you haven’t seen comparisons between [...]